Let’s Roll to The Rink

The weather is perfect, and the weekends have booked with pumpkin patch visits, checking out apple orchards, basketball games, sports camps, and also a load of birthday parties!! This past weekend, my boys had a jam packed day of basketball games, and birthday parties. Something I’ve mentally prepping myself for about 2 weeks. I told my husband, we’d have to tag team this pas weekend, because I knew I was going to burn on halfway through. Luckily, we made it work out!

The first birthday party of the day was a roller skating rink here in Sacramento. Folks, I haven’t been at the Roller Skating Rink, since I was 9! So this was totally, excited to be attending this party with my son. I came in walking in my Toms, and had an extra pair of socks waiting in the car. As nervous as I was to have my son possibly back out of roller skating, he surprisingly was down to participate. ONLY with the exception that mommy does it with him. (I was soooo happy he needed me!!) I ran off back to the parking-lot and got my socks!

| The Rink |

Address:

2900 Bradshaw Rd.

Sacramento, CA 95827

| YELP |

Roller skating is definitely a dying activity, but I’m so happy theres a few locations like these in Sacramento. The kids had these PVC Pipe trainers, that support the child with roller-skating — which was totally cool. And having the classic roller skates on, definietly brought me back to my childhood. To enjoy a classic activity, that was honestly already old when I was a kids, is certainly a homerun in activity experiences with my kids.

For those of you local in the Sacramento area, The Rink, currently has a Groupon going on! An offer of roller-skating with skate rentals for two or four (up to 53% OFF!!) That’s a weekend activity right there to get the children out of the house!  Groupon offers:

Admission and Skate Rental for 4 = $16 ($34 Offer, ends 10/16!)

Skate Package for 2: Includes Admission, Skate Rental, 2 Slices of Pizza, and 2 Small Drinks = $12 ($25 Deal!)

Purchase the Groupon Offer HERE! | Groupon |

Throwback Thursday: Kids Chore Chart

2 years ago, at the early start of my blogging career, I had made the first attempt of a chore chart for my boys. Still young, beginning to read, and also still trying to understand responsibilities within the home… I thought it was was great way for him to show mommy and daddy that he can help around the house.

At the time my children were 7 and 4, it was a bit pre-mature for me to create a chore chart that wasn’t so “kid-friendly,” for them to use. Mason jar, and post clip. I might as well have painted “Job for hire,” on the wooden slab!!

In honor of Throwback Thursday, here’s the actual blog post.

| HERE |

If you’re interest in more crafts and DIY Repurposing Projects check out my Makeovers & Repurpose Page

Today, my boys are now 10 & 6. Both capable of reading. My older son has grown up already understanding house chores, and what his responsibilities are in the household. Having him is also a great example for his little brother to understand the concept of working hard around the house, and having to do it without mommy or daddy telling you to.

Earlier in the month, I had found a wall display board at my local Goodwill for $5. In perfect condition, I purchased it, and new I needed a display board to communicate the kids chores.

Here, I’d like to share my new and improved — or updated chore chart!!!

As the kids get older, it’s best that their chores get harder, as they can gain more responsibility.

For my older son, his chores are more difficult than his little brothers.

Here’s a few examples I have posted for my 10 year old.
Ages 8-10 would be capable of doing this as well

  • Make Bed Every Morning
  • Unload Dryer
  • Fold Clothes
  • Vacuum Main Living Areas
  • Wash Car
  • Put Away Dishes 
  • Make Lunch & Simple Meals
  • Prepare Small Snacks
  • Pull Weeds
  • Water Outdoor Plants
  • Feed/Clean Pets

As for my 6 year old, his chores consist of:

  • Wipe Down Bathroom Counters
  • Keep Living Room Clean/Organized
  • Sort Recycling
  • Put Away Dirty Clothes
  • Match Socks
  • Dust
  • Put Away Toys
  • Wipe Spills
  • Vacuum Small Corners
  • Water Indoor Plants

Nothing fancy riiight? It’s straight to the point. Look, review, take action. For my little one, I do have to read it to him, but the chart is definietly something for the boys to refer to.

As my oldest son turned 10 this month, it was just a reminder that I’ve been at parent for 10 YEARS!!! Yes girl, yes! Out of the 31 years I’ve been on earth, 10 years I’ve been a parent! So, hopefully that would give me more credibility on my blog as a dependable resource for motherhood. Eh?! I hope so.

This time around with my updated chore chart, I’ve left it a little similar like the first one, but this time, with a marketing tactic with my neon colored messaged. My oldest son loves it.

(It’s a great reminder for him, that along with chores, comes allowance at the end of the week.)

#ParentingPerk #ChoreBenefits

What are your chore chart solutions? Anything similar to my message board? Comment below, and share with me your chores for each age group! I’d love to see what jobs you give your children!!

Happier Mornings

The holiday season is slowly approaching, but until then it’s the crazy and most busiest season for most families. Before the boys wake up for school, I stand in my kitchen analyzing our family white board. Schedules are so crazy right now, especially with birthdays every weekend, appointment visits, and early dismissals, it’s hard to keep track of all of it. Every morning feels like a Monday morning. Getting the kids ready for school until I drop them off is a precious time for me schedule and get organize. It’s a time for me to process our day/week/month and so forth.

Too boot out the crazy season, crazy mornings are evidently to happen. Rushing my children to get, change, eat breakfast, up brush their teeth, pack homework its an insane tornado every morning. Develop new behaviors and practices for yourself. Here are a few secrets to happier mornings:

 

Challenge Them

Instead of rushing them, challenge them. As your child is slowly packing their backpack, tell your kids that you doubt they can do it. Naturally we as parents feel we have to explain every single thing to our children. But actually, of you say, ‘I bet you can’t get dressed all by yourself,’ your child will most likely respond, ‘Oh yes I can! Watch!’ Once your child completes the task, praise him!! This will encourage an encore performance.

Practice

Self-sufficiency requires some repetition. The good news: About two weeks of dedication is all parents need to get kids with the program. During that time, help your child get through each task until he can do it entirely without you. Then fade out those prompts and you’re done.

Do Some Prep

A bit of advance legwork, like laying out the next day’s outfit or putting out the cereal the night before, can save a lot of hand-holding during the a.m rush. Growing up (in a Filipino household) I’ve witnessed my mom cook dinner in the wee hours of the night. She would be cooking loads of food for the week to feed our family. My mom would also prep my dad’s lunch the same night. It was what we say ‘baon’ (pronounced “bah-own”) in Tagalog.  She’d pack two tupperware for him, one filled with rice, the other with the specialty dish, usually a soup meat based dish with boil veggies. I saw my mom do this ever since I was a little girl, until the day I moved out later in my early twenties.

Now, as a mother, I need the efficiency in her methods. My dad still this day grabs his lunch every morning, as I do the same for my young boys with their breakfast and school lunches.

Set A Fast Pace

One morning I left the kids for a moment as they were eating their breakfast, to do the rest of my make-up (yes, if I have a few minutes to spare I apply some make-up as a refresher) When the kids linger, just this week I caught the boys playing checkers as they were waiting. Try to beat the clock!! Pick a series of related tasks (think: brushing teeth, putting on socks and shoes), set a timer for a few minutes, and ask your kid if he can do them before the buzzer sounds. Every time he wins, he gets a point to be used for a treat.

Raising boys: They love games. Create a game for anything. That brings us back to challenging them.

Calm Yourself

The more stressed you get, the less likely kids will do what you ask. To decompress, walk to the end of the house and back. Remember you can always try again tomorrow. Something I’ve been practicing is openly apologizing for rushed and late days when things were clearly at my fault. In the car as I drop my son off school a few minutes late “I’m sorry we were late today. Tomorrow we will wake up earlier, and get it right tomorrow.”

You can’t go wrong with apologies, and being accountable when you are at fault. We learn from our mistakes, and make better choices next time and get better the following day. Admitting to minor faults, and practicing them to your children will teach them honesty, and liable to their own actions.

Follow the above steps to create happier mornings in your household and I promise you, just developing new behaviors will produce not just happier morning within a home, but happier family.

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Alternately Edited by Jennifer O’Neil Scholastic.com/ParentAndChild