Life Lessons with Little League

Spring is basically here, and our children have moved from winter sports to spring sports. What usually is within the months of end of February to early June, these sports usually consist of soccer, basketball, and the ever post popular spring time sport, baseball.

I’ve been in the little league world for 4 years with my oldest son. 1 year, I was even brave enough to have both boys enrolled in little league at once! What is probably typical for some families with multiple children in little league, it was definitely a shuffle for us as a family to oblige to the boys baseball schedules.

For new parents introducing their child’s first sport, I highly, highly recommend little league for your child. As your child starts at the age of 5 (sometimes even 3-4!) tee-ball is introduced, with the fundamentals of baseball. The basics. There are great life lessons learned through tee-ball as well! Whether or not your son sticks with sports all the through childhood, even just a few years can teach him a lot.

  • Paying Attention
  • Practice/Persistence
  • Showing Up
  • Luck
  • Successful = Having Copycats
  • Just Do IT!
  • Scorekeeping?
  • Rainy Days

Last year, we had moved to a new city, which meant my oldest son started at a new little league. We’ve moved around from different little leagues before, but our previous league was by far our favorite. (Shout out to Fremont American Little League!!!)

If you’re excited out this little league season, having it be your child’s first time, here’s what your little slugger will gain.

  1. Paying Attention
    During tee-ball, the kids are basically playing in the dirt, or catching butterflies in the outfield. It happens more often then not. T-ball practice and games isn’t a place to play in the dirt or catch butterflies.. It’s inevitable that the hardest hit balls will find the kids who aren’t paying attention. They’ll either miss their chance to catch a ball, or they’ll get drilled. If you don’t pay attention in life, you’ll miss some great opportunities.
  2. Practice/Persistence
    Most kids aren’t natural talents when it comes to t-ball. Some can swing and miss 10 or more times before they hit the ball. And catching isn’t exactly easy either. But when they eventually hit one, it’s awesome. The look of pride and joy on their faces is priceless. That’s when they realize that if they stick to something and work at it, they can accomplish their goal. Definitely a valuable life lesson.
  3. Showing Up
    Even though my boys love t-ball, there have been a few times when one of them didn’t want to go to his game, or parents made prior engagements on weekend game days (I am guilty to this.) But once you bring your son to his game, he’ll most likely have a great time and is glad he went. This is true in many aspects of life. Whether it’s school, work or just going to the gym to work out. Getting yourself to show up is often the most difficult part.
  4. Luck
    When your son hits that ball at first swing, and runs his little tail off to first base and is safe, its an amazing feeling! Or when he’ll stick his glove out and turn his head away as a fly comes down from the sky directly toward him…and lands right in his glove. Luck isn’t something that should be relied upon. But when it happens, it’s a pretty cool feeling.
  5. Successful = Having Copycats
    One kid will hit a home run and a bunch of his teammates will want to use his bat the rest of the game. To 4 and 5-year olds, the bat is the “secret sauce.” When someone is successful in life, other people want to know how he achieved such success and how they can get there, too!
  6. Just Do IT!
    After all the practices and preparation, the big moment will arrive. At game days a kid will have his first at bat in an official game. He’s put in the work. He knows what to do. The ball is right in front of him, resting on the tee. He just has to swing. In life, you can analyze, study, practice, prepare, think and debate. But when it comes down to it, if you want to accomplish anything, you’ve got to take your shot. Just swing and see what happens.
  7. Scorekeeping?
    In tee-ball no one keeps score at the games. The kids don’t mind. They just want to have fun. There are so many competitive aspects in life. Everything from merging into traffic to answering the question, “What do you do for a living?” can feel like a competition.
  8. Rainy Days
    Sometimes the sky will open up and a pouring rain will ruin all your plans. That’s usually how it goes for spring ball. But it doesn’t have to ruin your day. “Sometimes you win. Sometimes you lose. Sometimes, it rains.” 

    So there’s the life lessons of little league!!! If you’re child is returning back to little league, or you’re new to the baseball community with your child, welcome! Have fun! Let the kids play, and plaaaaay baaaaalll!

From Stroller To Scooter

I’m happy I’m done with the stroller stage of parenting. It was great while it lasted, the wonderful perks of having a safety seat for your infant/toddler to peacefully nap, and also the wonderful amount of storage for your phone, bottle, and drinks. But let’s face it. The struggle was real when baby wasn’t in the mood to stroll through the mall or downtown. The width of your stroller wasn’t even small enough to move through clothe aisles at the department store, which all even came down to why did you even go out today.

Well, have no fear parents. It get’s easier. As I’ve been out of the stroller game now, for about 2 years, it’s come clear that my boys are growing faster than I’d like. In my last post, I even mentioned that my eldest son (who’s 9) will no longer want to participate in my holiday crafts. Yes, yes, we all know the Holiday Pinteresty crafts are fun to do with our children, but about as they grow older??

This post, I’d like to cover a few issues of parenting, and how to deal with our growing children, and also transitioning out from the stroller to the scooter. Something my boys use on the regular as we explore through our wonderful new city of Sacramento.

helloSAC

If you’re new to my blog, welcome! I’m happy you’re here! My family and I just recently moved from the San Francisco Bay Area, to sunny (well right now, really chilly) Sacramento! You can check out more details about our big move HERE!

scooters

The family and I love exploring around Sacramento. Moving into a new city, there’s so much to see, and find. But driving to every neighborhood, business plaza, and coffee shop is no fun. Rather, we’d like to walk as we can see the city from a different perspective! However, my kids enjoy taking their razor scooter around. My first son received his first scooter on this 5th birthday, and is how he learned to transition to a 2 wheeler. My second son, was the same. instead of the balance bike (which are more expensive than a scooter) we gave him a scooter, and within a short time, we was on a 2 wheeler 3 months after turning 5.

Before scooters, strollers where the only way of life to get by traveling with baby/toddler.

Pictures

Above, 2013 Walnut Creek, CA

Below, 2013 Downtown San Jose, CA

screen-shot-2016-11-29-at-12-33-37-am

 

This December, get a special little someone a scooter!!! It makes a perfect holiday gift for kids ages 18 months and older. It’s fun, plus riding a scooter hones gross and fine motor skills that are useful for learning, sports and other life skills.

The Benefits Of Kick Scooters For Kids

Balance and Direction

Scooters are powered first by a kick but directed using balance. Scooters can help improve coordination with use at any age, but particularly when kids are young and learning how to balance using their weight.

Gross and Fine Motor Skills

Developing gross and fine motor skills enables kids to become more independent, while opening doors to exploration, creativity and learning.

Scooter help develop both sets of motor skills kids need in everyday life. Scooters must be transported to a place of play (often by the kids), and can even be used a as a centerpiece for imaginary play…Going down hills! (steep driveways!)

Pre-Reading Skills

The above benefits are also essential pre-reading skills for very young kids.  Motor skills are essential for a number of other reasons. Kids not only need to hold the books and flip pages, but a good pencil grip later enables them to write words down in order to remember them better. They’ll hone motor skills to brush teeth, type and a number of other things throughout their lives.

Confidence

It usually doesn’t take long for kids to master riding a kick scooter. Like, I mentioned, my kids started being on the scooter at age 5. That’s Pre-Kinder age! When they do, the confidence knowing they can handle it can potentially make them eager to tackle other skills.

Safety

A helmut is require by California law for non-motorized scooters, skateboards and bikes for anyone who is under the age of 18. Through riding scooters, kids can understand a bit more about the importance of protecting their bodies and consequences of not doing so.

(BAD MOM Truth: I don’t carry helmets. The kids usually are with me on the sideway. And I never go anywhere soo busy and over populated with traffic)

Fun

Seriously, kids love the freedom and ease that riding a scooter provides. Bottom line is that kick scooters are fun and also let them ride when walking might be a burden.

See more razor scooting around Sac on my Instagram!

instagram

My YumBox

I’m a huge supporter of entrepreneurs. Especially those who are stay at home moms using their creative skill and talent and making a name for themselves!!! And I’m taking about small Etsy/Homemaker/Handcrafter kind pf business. I love those creative entrepreneurs! Over the holiday break I ordered custom hand lettered stickers from Krystal Hays of Pen To Paper. I had just ordered two Yumbox’s for my boys school lunches, and started following them on Instagram. I spotted a post of featuring Pen To Paper of custom hand lettered name sticker placed on a magenta Yumbox. After seeing that post, I needed to order one of my own!!! I’m a fan of hand lettering and classic calligraphy. I’ve dabbled my way through it, but never really fully took a full swing of consistently creating pieces of art with it.

Screen Shot 2016-01-05 at 1.22.46 PM

 

When I saw Krystal’s hand lettered Yumbox sticker, I literally squealed! Using handwriting calligraphy and applying it to another medium of digital cut stickers is awesome!! I love the the two ideas mixed! Of course, we are all used to the beautiful handwritten wedding invitations, escort cards, holiday prints and other paper and pen basics, but this?! I LOVE. I love different. I love mixed mediums.

I was in between ordering each of my boys names, but knowing that my boys will grow out of the Yumbox stage, and perhaps be embarrassed that their name will be on a lunchbox, I’ll save them the trouble. (Cool mom?) Anywho, I went with the boys last names just to make things easier. (I may have over thought it through, but I’m went for it!) And look how amazing they turned out!!

yumboxpin

You can check out Pen To Paper’s online store HERE.

Interested in a Yumbox?

It’s the perfect gift for the littles, or anyone who loves packing their lunch! Check out a store near you for a Yumbox or online!

YumboxLunch online store.

 

YumBox

I get giddy when people repost my posts. Hehehe.

What a great start to the new year!

 

BLOG_Signature

Volunteering Gig

We all want to be involved at our kid’s school. But squeezing in the time and figuring out where you fit in can be hard. It’s not just fitting it in – in your schedule, but socially too. I’m a young mom, well, I’d like to say I’m a young mom now approaching 30 but done with the diaper/toddler stage. Both my children are now at grade school level, and fitting in with other parents is difficult. While some were starting college, I was in 2nd grade. Now, as adults we’re both in the same communities for our children. I’ll come back to socially fitting in as a parent at your child’s school later on, but let’s continue to focus on volunteering.

This guide below inspired by Scholastic.com will help match your life to the best volunteering jobs. You’ll be helping out without stressing out before you know it!

parentvolunteering

Above is me at my son’s Nursery school. Once a week I’d come in and develop a greater bond with my child by sharing his nursery school experience. 

Early Days Of Volunteering

Many years before having children, I was volunteering at hospitals, after-school programs, care homes, to community churches and festivals. All throughout high-school my best memories were helping out the community. My very first volunteering gig was being a candy striper hospital volunteer. Candy stripers make a hospital visit pleasant by eating with, reading to, assisting or delivering items to patients. I passed out snacks to new moms in their recovery rooms, and also took pictures of the new borns! I also did afternoon crafting in the corner of the pediatrics department.

My first job was a SCORE! coach for an after school tutoring service called SCORE! Educational Centers. Helping out children has always be of some interest to me I enjoyed helping out with children, practicing methods of positive reinforcement, and helping students set and achieve academic goals. Jumping straight into motherhood at 21, helping out children has been a background of mine. Below is a guide I follow with have two children 4 & 8. As a stay-at-home mom I believe it’s my duty to give back. Check out I was able to find my perfect volunteering gig.

Volunteer3

That’s me and my son Tristan. Coming into his classroom gave me an opportunity to observe how my child gets along with other children and adults.

Become A School Volunteer!

You life is….

Basically Insane

  • You and your partner work crazy long hours.
  • You have a kid (or two) still in diapers.

Start as a booster or attendee: If you have more money than time, write a check for the new monkey bars or the after-school art instructor. Don’t feel guilty- a donation is always welcome.

If you have more money than time, attend school events! You’ll be expanding the PTA community beyond the same few families, which is a good thing!

 

You life is….

Mostly Workable

  • Your boss lets you arrive late or leave early, and your partner’s job is flexible, too!
  • Your youngest is in elementary school.

 

You’d be great as an event volunteer or committee member. What to know: If you’re signing up for an event, look for opportunities that let your bond with fellow moms and dads, like joining a craft table pr the cleanup crew.

A year ago I had enrolled youngest son was put in a Nursery school, where I developed a greater understanding of my own child and all children. As it was a parent-run, not-for-profit organization dedicated to providing a high quality preschool experience for children. One day a week positions were given to the parents to sit in and help in the classroom with active rolls and duties to complete. Weekends, parents we were come in a care of the facility and school yard. It was a really interesting approach in learning for my son, and myself. Co-Ops or cooperative schools is definitely a great intro to learning with your children socially and as well with other parents. However,  participating parent obligations are needed, this boosts future willed volunteering positions later on in your child’s school life.

If you want to be a committee member, set specific parameters instead of taking on a open-ended role. That way, you know what’s expected of you-sending out the email blasts, say-and you don’t put in more time than anticipated.

When my oldest son was in 2nd grade, I arranged with his teacher that I can come in every Friday for a crafternoon (Crafting afternoon.) It was perfectly set, as the kids just arrived back from lunch, winded down with a book reading, and settled into groups as the teacher and myself rotated groups with different activity tables. What was fun was most holiday events landed on a Friday that school year, and I hosted the classroom party as well.

 

Your life is….

Pretty Flexible

  • You work part-time and have an understanding partner.
  • Your grade-school kids are fairly independent by now.

Set you sights on class parent and be prepared to: Plan parties, collect donations, send emails, and round up snacks. Partner with someone who has what you don’t, like time in the mornings or an outgoing personality.

This is one stage I am currently at right now with my boys. The time flexibility is there, but I don’t quite have the outgoing personality as I think I might have. So, I plan class treats, all day volunteering a few times a month, and plan the holiday parties.

 

Your life is….

Ready For More!

  • You work at home and have a chill partner!
  • Your youngest kids is already in grade school (or you have ultra-reliable childcare)

PTA Positions Keep in mind: This is a commitment, and full time job. The role is to listen to parents and ideas. Being a school advocate as district meetings, and maintaining a good relationship with the principal. It’s a lot of work, but the rewards are pretty exciting: After all, because of the hard work and dedication, you’re sure to see positive changes at your school!

Alternately Edited By Francesaca Castagnoli Scholastic.com/ParentAndChild

 

Overall, as parents, most of our plates are not only full but overflowing; our schedules are so tight they’re cutting off blood flow and our to-do lists are endless. The last thing any of us truly wants to do is commit to another project, group, or organization. But the one area of volunteering shouldn’t be ignored. The ongoing social, academic and emotional success of our kids relies heavily on the amazing network of parents and guardians. I hope the above tips can help you find a place within your lifestyle to help out at your child’s school.

What do you do for your kids school? Are you a stay-at-home-mom, that comes into class once or twice a week? Are you part of the PTA, and take a pretty active roll within the school? Comment below!

BLOG_Signature

Stay-At-Home Mom Flatline

I became a stay-at-home mom at the age of 24, after my second son was born back in 2010. My boyfriend has been blessed to be able to provide for our family, while I can stay at home with the children. At the beginning stages of stay-at-home living, we were in a small 2 bedroom apartment. I’d drop off my boyfriend to BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit), and my older son to daycare. I’d stay home and cater to all household needs, as well as my newborn baby boy. Eat, sleep, pump, prep meals on repeat. That was my routine.

3 months passed, and we moved into a 5 bedroom home that was provided by my parents paying a small portion of rent helping them out with their mortgage. It was definitely a steal here in the Bay Area -especially being extremely close to the Dumbarton Bridge, which connects the East Bay to the Peninsula including cities such as Redwood City, Palo Alto, and Half Moon Bay just to name a few…

After the move, my older son entered Kindergarten, and my boyfriend was hired at a social media marketing company that helped advertisers manage their pages on Facebook. The company was at their early start-up phase, and was conveniently located across the bridge in Palo Alto. I stayed home, continued to care for my boys and in a larger home. Cleaning was exceedingly difficult, more room = more mess.

 

My sons grew older, birthdays and career milestones were celebrated, while I just stayed a flat momentum of personal growth. Watching my children grow, my boyfriends career grow, and square-footage of our home grow.

 

We’ve then moved out of my parents property, my son entered 1st grade at a new school, new job opportunities for daddy. We are now at a new routine change. My youngest is now in Pre-K, the other in entering 3rd and the boyfriend works remotely from home. The time off opportunity starts now. I’ve failed in increase the past four years. Any mother can understand that we are all opportunist. At times we have absolute no time for even sitting. A stay-at-home mom’s life is all about the house and your children. At times I literally stand while I eat, and I purposely wear gym wear majority of the time, because I feel like I’m actually working out while cleaning, running errands, and always always always doing things for others around the house, and for the house.

As I mentioned in my Journey To 30, 28 wasn’t so great. It was the actual time it really hit me. I’m approaching my 30s, and I want something to show for. …For myself. No one else. I want to challenge myself, try something new, something different, an outlet for me to express myself, personally and creatively. A possible way to provide for my family,  which does not eat away time from my family, that is Number ONE.  Being a stay-at-home mom doesn’t always get any credibility unless someone truly knows what its like. I’m not asking for a high-five, or gold sticker. I just want time for myself for personal growth.

Socially, financially, and emotionally, it’s hard to find my village of moms, and the support. So I always went to the internet. Mommy Blogs, Facebook groups, online forums, MeetUps and YouTube. I’ve found my community there. It was “live,” it’s real, it’s relatable. I gravitate towards mothers/women who share the same lifestyle as me, and have similar interests. There are so many different types of people out there, personalities, and you won’t always mesh well with all of them. And thats ok. There will be times searching for that outlet will remain static…But I pushed myself to keep searching, and improving myself in the mean time.

Bottom line, I’m done being at a flatline. I refuse to continue to fail to increase; to stop remaining static as a stay-at-home mom. Here goes to my new creative challenge and on going personal project.

Being myself and improving myself.

BLOG_Signature

Summer Chores

With summer vacation already 2 in a half weeks in, I decided to change up our current chore chart. Last February, I made this crafty wooden chore chart that displayed the boys assigned household chores, as well as an award jar. At the end of the week, if all chores were complete the boys would take the reward. My older son, Jaeden gets a dollar and my youngest, Tristan, gets a lollipop.

The boys have to some extent gotten used to their chores. But as they’re getting older, one just turned 8 and my youngest slowly progressing and developing the chores has a natural habit; I believe its time to freshen up the current chores to a summer chore edition!

They’re current chores are age appropriate chores. Based on my own family’s experience, and seeing what my kids are able to handle. Obviously, my 8 year olds chores are way more advanced than my 4 year olds. Summer is a great time to get kids into the habit of doing chores. With more free time in the morning and evening good habits can take hold before the school year begins again.

ChoreChart

Check out my post on how I made this Chore Chart HERE.

Teaching your kids to do chores at a young age is the key to developing a good habits in your children. Here are some of the age appropriate chores I have for my 2 young boys.

Summer Chores

Preschooler (Ages 4-5)

– Help clean playroom

– Put shoes away

– Keep toys organized

– Help collect recycling (Water bottles)

– Bring plate and cup to sink after meal.

– Put dirty clothes into the hamper.

– Wipe up after spills.

Early Elementary (Ages 6-8)

Any previous chores….

– Take out garbage and recycling

– Feed pets

– Put dirty clothes to garage laundry basket

– Vacuum bedroom & playroom

– Clear bunk-bed toys, and remove bedsheets

– Rake leaves

Summer Chores

– Help mommy bringing in groceries

– Meal prep (wash produce & simple cutting)

– Put dishes into sink

– Wipe down bathroom countertops

– Collect

– Get mail

– Wash car

– Fold laundry (towels)

Soon enough, my 8yr old son’s daily chore chart will be integrated with this summer’s chores. I’m really looking forward to my boys helping around the house with these easy simple chores. It’ll make mommys life SO MUCH easier.

Does your household have a chore chart or responsibility chart? Let me know what you have your kids doing! Please share!

Smiles

Watermelon Paper Craft

Watermelon

Each week, I really try to incorporate 2-3 crafts with my kids. There is no specific day or time I do the craft, but just as long as I do my research beginning of the week, and have all the supplies readily available (at arms reach), and then squeeze it in at the perfect opportunity. Usually, I’ll mention that we’ll be doing a craft at some point of the day during breakfast, and I basically see what the reaction is with my boys. Majority of the time, they are always down, or bring up something they want to do.

This week, we focused our week on fruits. The heat is definitely heating up here in the Bay Area, and fruits have become such a staple to keep up cool and refreshed. Watermelons are one of my favorite fruits, so what better way to enjoy a watermelon craft!

Here’s what you’ll need:

– Paper plates

– Scissors

– Black marker

– Crayons/Markers/Paint

– Bakers twine or ribbon (to make the watermelon into a fun garland!)

– Tape

Directions:

1.) Have your child cut down the middle of paper plate, to have 2 halves.

This simple task will kick start your preschooler to use his/her little hands to develop their fine motor skills by learning the proper way to cut paper.

2.) Using your selected color medium, have your child color the outside rim of the plate green. That will be the rind of the watermelon.

3.) Color the rest of plate red.

4.) Take your black colored marker and add in the “seeds.”

After that, you have your completed watermelon. If you want to take it to a decorative option to display your watermelon, cut the watermelon into slices, and tape bakers twine to the back of each slice!!

Garland

This garland will then become a nice decorative garland piece to hang around the house!

What’s great about this craft, is it’s super easy, supplies are some what staples to have around the house, and also you create many different avenues for simple math problems. Easy right?! Have a wonderful summer! And check back again for another fruit themed summer kids craft!

Smiles

 

DIY Mini Water Blobs

Summer trend: Kimono’s. No….But yes. It’s Water blobs!!! After surfing on Pinterest, following other mom bloggers, and my favorite YouTube vloggers, I’ve frequently been seeing these plastic water bed blobs everywhere. After doing research, reading other tutorials, and seeing it done on YouTube, I thought I should give it a shot.Water Blob

These mini water blobs were inspired off of Hello, Wonderful by momtributor: Agnes Hsu

The wonderful advantages of these mini water blobs are:

– easier to iron smaller blobs than one large one
– faster to fill up with water
– each kid gets to take their own water blob home

WalMart

After a quick visit to WalMart, I was able to purchase everything I needed under $20. (That’s a $6 iron right there!)Materials

Here’s what you’ll need:

– Plastic Sheeting (Can be found at any hardware store.)

– Parchment Paper

– Food Coloring

– Scissors

– Duck Tape

– Iron

– Tiny Aquatic Toys (Sharks/Crabs/Fish)

I used leftover plastic fishies, which I had from a Mermaid Party last year.Cut

Directions:

1.) First, you’ll need to cut the plastic sheeting. I unrolled the plastic and had my son (while watching Paw Patrol) lay right on top of the plastic.

2.) Give 4-5inch wiggle room, then cut.

3.) Unfold, then cut piece of plastic. Measure out how large you would like your water blob. (Go large if you’d like, but California is going through a drought at the moment, so going mini is perfect.)

Be sure you have two sheets that are already layered. I simply unfolded the piece out, but made sure two sheets were always layered above each other.

Measure

4.) Cut the large pieces to create 2 minis. Mine conveniently became two, which was perfect, for my two boys.

Cut as many as you need. This just ended up being the correct amount of pieces I needed. I plan to make more for the neighborhood kids, so my first initial cut will be a lot more longer. 

Parchment Paper

5.)  Next, pull out a generous amount of parchment paper (A little under 1 yard). Fold it in half long ways.

6.) With a ruler and sharpie; from the fold measure out 3-4 inches, and draw a line.

This will be your guide as you start ironing the plastic sheeting. The folded parchment paper will be your heat protecter from the iron to the plastic.

Paper Plastic

Here’s how the plastic sheeting and parchment paper should be positioned. The line will indicate the zone you’ll be ironing.

7.) Insert the plastic sheeting flush to the fold of the parchment paper.

8.) Next, pre-heat your iron. And start ironing within the designated area.

I measured out 2inches (but ended up ironing over the line just a little bit.) 

All depending on how large you created your plastic sheet pillow case, all depends on how much leeway you can give on the edges.

Iron

You’ll see once you iron over the parchment paper, let it set to dry a couple seconds after direct heat.

9.) Peel over the parchment paper, and reposition it over the next area of un-ironed plastic sheeting.

10.) Once you’ve iron majority of the plastic “pillow case,” leave an opening for your garden hose.

DO NOT IRON THAT AREA.

Iron Tasks

(Above Left) Is what the plastic sheeting should look like once it’s melted together.

(Below) Are two plastic sheeting “pillow cases,” ready to be filled with water.

Complete

Now, for the fun part!!! Once the actual blob ironed and ready, all the extra “frou frous,” should be on hand. This is when you can get your children involved because this can all be taken outside.

Additons

Here you’ll need:

– Duck Tape

(I purposely chose this aqua colored duck tape to compliment the whole aquatic color scheme of this craft.)

– Tiny Aquatic Toys (Sharks/Crabs/Fish)

I used leftover plastic fishies, which I had used for a Mermaid birthday party last year. I’m SO happy I did not toss them out!!!

Steps

At this point, everything is pretty self-explanatory. If you look at the above pictures.

– Fill up the plastic pillow case with water (DO NOT OVER FILL!) Just enough so there’s enough movement when your child is on it.

When waiting for the water to fill, instead of standing and waiting, place it over a chair!

(Walk, away, prepare a snack, or Instagram this cool craft to share with your friends!)

– Add food coloring. We decided on blue, for that fun water look.

– Add in aquatic toys.

– Use duck tape to seal the blob.

Have the duck tape already pre-cut and waiting, once the blob is filled. It’ll make it so much easier and efficient to complete!

Done

And there you go! A water blob!!! This cool funky  mini water bed gave my son at least 2.5 hours of play! He jumped on it, relaxed on it, and also just sat on it playing with his cars!!!!

Once my older son came home from summer school, I made him do all the steps himself starting with filling it up.

He added the yellow/green food coloring.

(We’re big fans of blues and greens in our house!)

 Green

Have you made a water blob before?! Especially a large one? Let me know how that went!

Submit a comment tell me about, or any other cool fun summer crafts!!

Have a happy summer guys!!

Smiles

Local Baseball Celebrity

In last weekend’s post 5K To Wedding Day: PLUS Surprises, I had mentioned that an older gentleman claimed that my youngest son was on the front of our local bulletin paper. After being a mom-on-a-mission, checking local grocery stores, liquor stores, and asking around, this paper was no where to be found. But I kept getting strangers and other parents declare that he was on there. One other little league parent even had it on his phone. Texted from a family member who thought it was their nephew.

I was so mind boggled that this paper, non-the less the photo of my son was not able to be found online. Seriously, after calling around local new papers, and driving by local closed down paper headquarters, I was finally given an address. Luckily, everything was so close to home. I walked into The ARGUS office here in Fremont, (which, I had to do major calling around just to get their new office location), as well as they are pretty bad at updating their information online.

Front Page

The receptionist was able to help me and provide me 3 copies of the Fremont Bulletin. There you had it, my little 2T right beside the team banner next to his coaches, marching at their Little League Opening Day. My heart filled with warmth and joy, knowing our community has seen my little celebrity. To tell you, even last year, my older son was on the paper as well, and the team mom at the time was able to give me a copy of the paper. (Squeals!) My two children have been in the local paper. I know its not much, but years from now, I’ll be able to share these documented articles and show them how little they were, and how they were a face of their local little league.

Here’s a closer look of Tristan.

Fremont Bulletin

Thank you to the San Jose Mercury News, The ARGUS, and InsideBayArea.

Smiles

DIY Chore Chart

ChoreChart

(DIY Wooden Plank Chore Chart)

My 7 year old has now shown the interest in earning money. He’s quickly understanding the value of hard work. He’s started helping me pair socks together, take out the garbage and recycling, put away game consoles controllers, charge mobile devices/tablets, feed the parakeets, tidy his room and also the playroom. (Just to name a couple.) But now, his service isn’t free. He’s interested in money. What is he saving for? Nothing in particular, but the chance to shop for something at Toys”R”Us or GameStop on his own. What a good boy.

With all the chores he’s able to do, I swiftly needed to create some chore chart. But not any average chore chart you would see being held by a magnet on the fridge, but something custom. Rustic, fun and creative. Something, where I already had many of the supplies here at home. Of course I needed some PINspiration, and I came across The Winthrop Chronicles and her DIY Chore Chart. From there, I knew exactly what I needed.

I knew had some wooden planks I’ve purchased at the antique fair last spring. I purchased a few of them and never once got around to using them. Tucked away under the surface of my craftsman table.

(Off Tangent) Life Experience: 

Many of my antique fair purchases were impulse buys. Completely unnecessary. And a waste of money. That is why I no longer go to them anymore.  I’ve failed to ask myself a few questions before purchasing anything at the antique fair:

  1. Will I realistically use it often?
  2. If Instagram didn’t exist, would I still want it?
  3. Am I buying it because (The Glitter Guide‘s, Taylor Sterling) had it?

    And most importantly,
  4. Is this an impulse buy? (In most cases, yes. They all were.)

Back to my garage. It’s currently a warehouse filled with random antique artifacts. I thought I needed them, but in reality, I don’t. After gathering everything I had from my craft supplies, I headed straight to the hardware store for other tools I needed for the craft.

Plumbing Clamp (Different size plumbing clamps at the hardware store)

What You’ll Need:

  1. Wooden Plank Piece (Antique Fair Buy $5, which I’ve been hoarding.)
  2. Paint (Simple, white acrylic paint)
  3. Paper Clamp (Bulldog Clip)
  4. Scrapbook Paper
  5. 8oz. Mason Jar(s) depending how many children you have.
  6. Pipe Clamps (Plumbing section of your hardware store)
  7. Nails
  8. Hammer
  9. Hot Glue Gun
  10. Computer/Printer
  11. Paper Cutter/Scissors

Assembly

Directions:

  1. Purchase a plumbing clamp that fits the size of your mason jar.
  2. Adjust the clamp before nailing. (This shouldn’t be a problem if you do forget to adjust the clamp. But just incase.)
  3. Nail the clamp in the desired spot on the wooden plank.
  4. Attach your mason jar to the nailed clamp and begin hot gluing your bull dog clip.
    Note: Be sure you know where you want to position your text. Make ample room for that!

Nailed Clamp
(Nailed clamp)

5.   Begin painting your text. ‘Chore Chart’ or whatever you plan to title you craft, as well as personalizing your child’s name.

6.   Create document on your computer of the weeks chores. This gives you the freedom to swap out the chores whenever. I’ll be sticking with these chores for awhile, until my boys mature more.

7.   Print and cut out your chore document, and clip on to the paper clamp!

8.   Display your chore chart in your house for your children to see, and refer to everyday!

ChoreChartAnd there you have it! A DIY chore chart!! Be sure to pay your children at the end of the week, if that’s the system you’re working with! You can also just fill the mason jars with lollipops, candy, threats, gift cards, or coins! I love how my boys are growing into young responsible young men willing to help mommy out around the house! It’s honestly bittersweet! No more baby/toddler age, but now ready to become a strong responsible young child!

There are so many advantages to giving kids chores to do around the house. While it can often be easier to just do the household chores yourself, having extra hands to do the simple stuff, makes the day a lot easier to handle. Do you have a system for your children’s chores? Tell me about it! Comment below! I’d love to hear about it!

Smiles