Throwback Thursday: Kids Chore Chart

2 years ago, at the early start of my blogging career, I had made the first attempt of a chore chart for my boys. Still young, beginning to read, and also still trying to understand responsibilities within the home… I thought it was was great way for him to show mommy and daddy that he can help around the house.

At the time my children were 7 and 4, it was a bit pre-mature for me to create a chore chart that wasn’t so “kid-friendly,” for them to use. Mason jar, and post clip. I might as well have painted “Job for hire,” on the wooden slab!!

In honor of Throwback Thursday, here’s the actual blog post.

| HERE |

If you’re interest in more crafts and DIY Repurposing Projects check out my Makeovers & Repurpose Page

Today, my boys are now 10 & 6. Both capable of reading. My older son has grown up already understanding house chores, and what his responsibilities are in the household. Having him is also a great example for his little brother to understand the concept of working hard around the house, and having to do it without mommy or daddy telling you to.

Earlier in the month, I had found a wall display board at my local Goodwill for $5. In perfect condition, I purchased it, and new I needed a display board to communicate the kids chores.

Here, I’d like to share my new and improved — or updated chore chart!!!

As the kids get older, it’s best that their chores get harder, as they can gain more responsibility.

For my older son, his chores are more difficult than his little brothers.

Here’s a few examples I have posted for my 10 year old.
Ages 8-10 would be capable of doing this as well

  • Make Bed Every Morning
  • Unload Dryer
  • Fold Clothes
  • Vacuum Main Living Areas
  • Wash Car
  • Put Away Dishes 
  • Make Lunch & Simple Meals
  • Prepare Small Snacks
  • Pull Weeds
  • Water Outdoor Plants
  • Feed/Clean Pets

As for my 6 year old, his chores consist of:

  • Wipe Down Bathroom Counters
  • Keep Living Room Clean/Organized
  • Sort Recycling
  • Put Away Dirty Clothes
  • Match Socks
  • Dust
  • Put Away Toys
  • Wipe Spills
  • Vacuum Small Corners
  • Water Indoor Plants

Nothing fancy riiight? It’s straight to the point. Look, review, take action. For my little one, I do have to read it to him, but the chart is definietly something for the boys to refer to.

As my oldest son turned 10 this month, it was just a reminder that I’ve been at parent for 10 YEARS!!! Yes girl, yes! Out of the 31 years I’ve been on earth, 10 years I’ve been a parent! So, hopefully that would give me more credibility on my blog as a dependable resource for motherhood. Eh?! I hope so.

This time around with my updated chore chart, I’ve left it a little similar like the first one, but this time, with a marketing tactic with my neon colored messaged. My oldest son loves it.

(It’s a great reminder for him, that along with chores, comes allowance at the end of the week.)

#ParentingPerk #ChoreBenefits

What are your chore chart solutions? Anything similar to my message board? Comment below, and share with me your chores for each age group! I’d love to see what jobs you give your children!!

Summer Chores

With summer vacation already 2 in a half weeks in, I decided to change up our current chore chart. Last February, I made this crafty wooden chore chart that displayed the boys assigned household chores, as well as an award jar. At the end of the week, if all chores were complete the boys would take the reward. My older son, Jaeden gets a dollar and my youngest, Tristan, gets a lollipop.

The boys have to some extent gotten used to their chores. But as they’re getting older, one just turned 8 and my youngest slowly progressing and developing the chores has a natural habit; I believe its time to freshen up the current chores to a summer chore edition!

They’re current chores are age appropriate chores. Based on my own family’s experience, and seeing what my kids are able to handle. Obviously, my 8 year olds chores are way more advanced than my 4 year olds. Summer is a great time to get kids into the habit of doing chores. With more free time in the morning and evening good habits can take hold before the school year begins again.

ChoreChart

Check out my post on how I made this Chore Chart HERE.

Teaching your kids to do chores at a young age is the key to developing a good habits in your children. Here are some of the age appropriate chores I have for my 2 young boys.

Summer Chores

Preschooler (Ages 4-5)

– Help clean playroom

– Put shoes away

– Keep toys organized

– Help collect recycling (Water bottles)

– Bring plate and cup to sink after meal.

– Put dirty clothes into the hamper.

– Wipe up after spills.

Early Elementary (Ages 6-8)

Any previous chores….

– Take out garbage and recycling

– Feed pets

– Put dirty clothes to garage laundry basket

– Vacuum bedroom & playroom

– Clear bunk-bed toys, and remove bedsheets

– Rake leaves

Summer Chores

– Help mommy bringing in groceries

– Meal prep (wash produce & simple cutting)

– Put dishes into sink

– Wipe down bathroom countertops

– Collect

– Get mail

– Wash car

– Fold laundry (towels)

Soon enough, my 8yr old son’s daily chore chart will be integrated with this summer’s chores. I’m really looking forward to my boys helping around the house with these easy simple chores. It’ll make mommys life SO MUCH easier.

Does your household have a chore chart or responsibility chart? Let me know what you have your kids doing! Please share!

Smiles

DIY Chore Chart

ChoreChart

(DIY Wooden Plank Chore Chart)

My 7 year old has now shown the interest in earning money. He’s quickly understanding the value of hard work. He’s started helping me pair socks together, take out the garbage and recycling, put away game consoles controllers, charge mobile devices/tablets, feed the parakeets, tidy his room and also the playroom. (Just to name a couple.) But now, his service isn’t free. He’s interested in money. What is he saving for? Nothing in particular, but the chance to shop for something at Toys”R”Us or GameStop on his own. What a good boy.

With all the chores he’s able to do, I swiftly needed to create some chore chart. But not any average chore chart you would see being held by a magnet on the fridge, but something custom. Rustic, fun and creative. Something, where I already had many of the supplies here at home. Of course I needed some PINspiration, and I came across The Winthrop Chronicles and her DIY Chore Chart. From there, I knew exactly what I needed.

I knew had some wooden planks I’ve purchased at the antique fair last spring. I purchased a few of them and never once got around to using them. Tucked away under the surface of my craftsman table.

(Off Tangent) Life Experience: 

Many of my antique fair purchases were impulse buys. Completely unnecessary. And a waste of money. That is why I no longer go to them anymore.  I’ve failed to ask myself a few questions before purchasing anything at the antique fair:

  1. Will I realistically use it often?
  2. If Instagram didn’t exist, would I still want it?
  3. Am I buying it because (The Glitter Guide‘s, Taylor Sterling) had it?

    And most importantly,
  4. Is this an impulse buy? (In most cases, yes. They all were.)

Back to my garage. It’s currently a warehouse filled with random antique artifacts. I thought I needed them, but in reality, I don’t. After gathering everything I had from my craft supplies, I headed straight to the hardware store for other tools I needed for the craft.

Plumbing Clamp (Different size plumbing clamps at the hardware store)

What You’ll Need:

  1. Wooden Plank Piece (Antique Fair Buy $5, which I’ve been hoarding.)
  2. Paint (Simple, white acrylic paint)
  3. Paper Clamp (Bulldog Clip)
  4. Scrapbook Paper
  5. 8oz. Mason Jar(s) depending how many children you have.
  6. Pipe Clamps (Plumbing section of your hardware store)
  7. Nails
  8. Hammer
  9. Hot Glue Gun
  10. Computer/Printer
  11. Paper Cutter/Scissors

Assembly

Directions:

  1. Purchase a plumbing clamp that fits the size of your mason jar.
  2. Adjust the clamp before nailing. (This shouldn’t be a problem if you do forget to adjust the clamp. But just incase.)
  3. Nail the clamp in the desired spot on the wooden plank.
  4. Attach your mason jar to the nailed clamp and begin hot gluing your bull dog clip.
    Note: Be sure you know where you want to position your text. Make ample room for that!

Nailed Clamp
(Nailed clamp)

5.   Begin painting your text. ‘Chore Chart’ or whatever you plan to title you craft, as well as personalizing your child’s name.

6.   Create document on your computer of the weeks chores. This gives you the freedom to swap out the chores whenever. I’ll be sticking with these chores for awhile, until my boys mature more.

7.   Print and cut out your chore document, and clip on to the paper clamp!

8.   Display your chore chart in your house for your children to see, and refer to everyday!

ChoreChartAnd there you have it! A DIY chore chart!! Be sure to pay your children at the end of the week, if that’s the system you’re working with! You can also just fill the mason jars with lollipops, candy, threats, gift cards, or coins! I love how my boys are growing into young responsible young men willing to help mommy out around the house! It’s honestly bittersweet! No more baby/toddler age, but now ready to become a strong responsible young child!

There are so many advantages to giving kids chores to do around the house. While it can often be easier to just do the household chores yourself, having extra hands to do the simple stuff, makes the day a lot easier to handle. Do you have a system for your children’s chores? Tell me about it! Comment below! I’d love to hear about it!

Smiles